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Indian Alley through Indigenous Eyes

by Zizi Li

If the iconic final scene of Kent McKenzie's The Exiles where the young first-generation relocated Indians whom have been out carousing the whole night come back Bunker Hill and walk down the Indian Alley together gives a slim suggestion toward the potentiality of a new forming intertribal collectivity, Peters’s revised scene in the Legacy of Exiled NDNZ, which includes all seven indigenous youths [i.e. Spencer Battiest (Seminole/Choctaw), Vivian Garcia (Cherokee), Tony Moran (Navajo/Salvadorian), Courtney Alex (Navajo), Gladys Dakam (Lakota), Heather Singer (Navajo) and Kenneth Ramos (Barona Mission Band of Indians)], learning about Indian Alley and walking down it together firmly and determinedly, shows the strengthening of such transnational urban Indian collectivity and decolonial consciousness. Peters revises Mackenzie’s footage in such ways in her documentary that both respects their place as archival materials and recasts these non-Natives materials through Indigenous eyes and hands to assist the reclaims and retells of urban Indian narratives. She puts forward narratives from seven young urban Indians in LA on their and/or their families’ relocation experiences, asserting the vibrant present-tense existence and resistance of the urban Native communities.

Revised Indian Alley Footage

by Zizi Li

If the iconic final scene of Kent McKenzie's The Exiles where the young first-generation relocated Indians whom have been out carousing the whole night come back Bunker Hill and walk down the Indian Alley together gives a slim suggestion toward the potentiality of a new forming intertribal collectivity, Peters’s revised scene in the Legacy of Exiled NDNZ, which includes all seven indigenous youths [i.e. Spencer Battiest (Seminole/Choctaw), Vivian Garcia (Cherokee), Tony Moran (Navajo/Salvadorian), Courtney Alex (Navajo), Gladys Dakam (Lakota), Heather Singer (Navajo) and Kenneth Ramos (Barona Mission Band of Indians)], learning about Indian Alley and walking down it together firmly and determinedly, shows the strengthening of such transnational urban Indian collectivity and decolonial consciousness.

Peters revises Mackenzie’s footage in such ways in her documentary that both respects their place as archival materials and recasts these non-Natives materials through Indigenous eyes and hands to assist the reclaims and retells of urban Indian narratives. She puts forward narratives from seven young urban Indians in LA on their and/or their families’ relocation experiences, asserting the vibrant present-tense existence and resistance of the urban Native communities.

Indigenous Youths in LA Learning about and Walking down the Indian Alley

Seven young indigenous students/professionals living in LA gather at the Indian Alley to learn about its history while sharing their own stories as urban Indians.

from Legacy of Exiled NDNZ (2014)
Creator: Pamela J. Peters
Distributor: Red Wing Entertainment
Posted by Zizi Li
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