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Bounded Self-Control in "Ulysses"

by Charity-Joy Acchiardo

In the film clip from the 1954 feature “Ulysses” produced by Dino De Laurentiis and Carlo Ponti, Homer's hero (Kirk Douglas) recalls an episode of his odyssey - the temptation of the sirens. Wishing to hear their song, but knowing he will be tempted to go to them if he did, he urges his crew to “Tie me to the mast”, and “whatever orders I make, do not obey them”. This will ensure that his controlled, thinking, self who is determined to complete his journey rules over his myopic intuitive self who is likely to give in to visceral needs – an example of the dual-self. He further insists “And don't untie me”. In so doing, he employs a commitment devise to de-bias the self.

Bounded Self-Control in "Ulysses"

Wishing to hear the siren’s song, but knowing he will be tempted to go to them if he did, Ulysses urges his crew to tie him to the mast, thereby ensuring that his controlled, thinking self rules over his myopic, intuitive self.

from Ulysses (1954)
Creator: Mario Camerini
Distributor: Paramount Pictures
Posted by Charity-Joy Acchiardo
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